Sunday, February 7, 2010

Dracula, Part 2


(Dracula, Part 1 can be read here.)

So, carrying on with the discussion about
Dracula

Vampires and sex, an age-old coupling. The reasons are obvious: attacks that happen at night, usually on victims who are of the opposite gender to the vampires doing the attacking, and (in Dracula the novel) after the victims are in bed. And there's the whole neck-biting schtick
—which, as we all know, is more than a flirty little nibble.

There's a lot of writing out there concerning vampirism and Victorian views of sexuality, and there's a realm of scholarship that sees Dracula the character as freeing women sexually while Van Helsing, et al, try to suppress them. And, though the women seek help from their friends and send up prayers to God, they are drawn to the immortal count because their subconscious supposedly really, really wants him.

While such arguments might be made, there's not much in the novel itself to support them. Yeah, vampires may work their mojo, but they're presented as evil, and not all that sexy. Sensual, maybe, but not freeing. They're rapists—even the females. After all, rape isn't about sex or mutual expression or love. It's about power and control.

Dracula controls Lucy. He controls Mina. Neither woman wants what he's offering, and the men do what they can to stop him. Sure, they make some bonehead mistakes, like leaving Mina alone while they scout the count's London digs, but I never get the impression they are trying to suppress either woman. In fact, Mina and Jonathan seem quite happy with their marriage. Until Dracula gets involved, of course.

to be continued


1 comment:

jadesmith09 said...

Exactly: control, not the blood, is the most powerful reason for turning them into vampires.

Good article.

So there's a "Dracula, Part 3?" :)